Free Book Talks



BOOK TALKS are held on Sundays
at 1:30 p.m.

Please check back as we add our book talks for 2017 and beyond!

August 6
1:30 p.m.; Free
Join us for a free book talk with David T. Gilbert on his book "Civil War Battlefields: Walking the Trails of History" at 1:30 p.m.

From the “First Battle of Bull Run” to Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House four years later, this book celebrates the history and scenic beauty of these hallowed grounds in a large-format, beautifully produced volume.
 
Explore more than thirty Civil War battlefields— from Antietam to Chancellorsville, Gettysburg to Shiloh—including the first five national battlefield parks preserved by veterans in the 1890s. Each battlefield features extensive photos of the key sites and monuments, as well as beautiful landscapes and historic archival photography. The essays enable the reader to understand each battlefield from a strategic perspective—its topography, geography, and military value—the battle’s seminal moments, and its historical significance, and guide the reader on how best to tour the grounds on foot.
 
With maps, rarely seen archival photos, and stunning contemporary photography, this photo- and information-packed book is an inspirational bucket list for Civil War and history buffs, as well as those who wish to walk in the literal boot steps of American history.
 August 6
October 1
1:30 p.m.; Free
Join us for a free book talk with James Gindlesperger on his book "Fire on the Water: The USS Kearsarge and the CSS Alabama" at 1:30 p.m.
Under Captain Raphael Semmes, the CSS Alabama had been raiding Union merchant ships for nearly two years. The Alabama accounted for almost one of every four Union merchant ships lost during the entire Civil War, with more than 60 ships destroyed. The USS Kearsarge, captained first by Charles Pickering and later by John Winslow, chased the Alabama around the world. Winslow vowed to end the trail of destruction caused by the Alabama. The two finally met in an epic battle off the coast of France on June 19, 1864. Fire on the Water examines the voyages of the Alabama and the Kearsarge toward their destiny. Using the words of the participants, James Gindlesperger offers a rare look into life at sea during the American Civil War. This tale of raw adventure and extraordinary courage will be prized by historians, genealogists, and those who enjoy a good story. Many controversies in after-the-battle studies are also examined.
 October 1
October 8
1:30 p.m.; Free
Join us for a free book talk with Doug Crenshaw on his book "Richmond Shall Not Be Given Up" at 1:30 p.m.

About the Book:
For seven days, Lee planned ambitious attacks and launched them, one after another, hoping not just to drive Federals from the gates of Richmond but to obliterate them entirely.  In "Richmond Shall Not Be Given Up", historian Doug Crenshaw follows a battle so desperate that, ever-after, soldiers would remember that week simply as The Seven Days.  McClellan reeled.  The tide of war turned.  The Army of Northern Virginia was born.

About the Author:
Doug Crenshaw is a volunteer historic interpreter for the Richmond National Battlefield Park.  A member of the Richmond Civil War Roundtable, he is a speaker, presenter, tour leader, and the author of books on Glendale and Fort Harrison.  Doug is a descendant of the Sydnor family, which lived at Beaver Damn Creek during that battle, and the Binford family, which live behind the Malvern Hill battlefield.
 October 8
November 12
1:30 p.m.; Free
Join us for a free book talk with Rick Richter on his book "Three Cheers fro the Chesapeake" at 1:30 p.m.

Illustrated with previously unpublished photos, letters, documents, and diary entries, the untoldstory of the Chesapeake Artillery comes to light. Comprised chiefly of men who lived near the shores of its namesake bay, the Chesapeake Artillery was the last Confederate battery organized from the state of Maryland. It was also by far the smallest, with barely more than half the average enrollment of other Maryland batteries in the Confederate army. Despite its size, the unit was frequently cited for its bravery and efficiency, including by Stonewall Jackson. This is the history of the unit, from its formation through all its battles with the Army of Northern Virginia until the surrender at Appomattox, where only 13 men remained. A unique statistical analysis of census and military records data highlights its characteristics. Included is a complete roster of all the men who served in the unit.
 November 12